High School Laptops

The pastes below are unedited responses (from the ACTEM listserve) by Maine educators to the following questions:

MLTI, unofficial time line
Wiki page with suggestions for DOE, Apple
Charging carts, storage information (also unedited from ACTEM)
Nuts and Bolts

[Please feel free to help edit or organize; it's a wiki]

Great article on netbooks





Nuts and bolts: What do high schools need to know about the logistics of taking on one-one laptops?


From Henrico County's laptop plan: "For middle school students, laptop batteries are programmed to last four to six hours per day. Students need to charge their laptop at home each night, but there are stations throughout the school where students can re-charge their batteries during the day. In high schools, each classroom will also have four charged.... batteries for student classroom use as well."

1)Wireless access points, how many (one per classroom, other, power
settings channels, any watch out fors,,apple vs Cisco etc)

2)Charging stations‑ what works well, one in each room? Etc

3)power in the rooms for students with dead batteries, how do you handle
this classroom by classroom

4)Take home policies, is it allowed, insurance ( I think I saved a bunch
of these from earlier posts), but any learning would be appreciated

5)Tech staffing, what level, what skills, ratio of macbooks to techs for
staffing ratios

6)What do you do with existing labs?? How about CAD or adobe cs4 etc
labs, keep them replace them etc.

7) Whatever else that I am missing

I know we've done this one before as well, but I need to gather up all the information I can.

What can you guys tell me about your take home policies?

What do you do when it comes to insurance with the take home policy?

What is the average rate of lost/broken devices?

Any other details concerning insurance or device loss/breakage that we should know ...or even what you had for breakfast if you like? :)

thanks in advance all.


I'm pretty sure that the wireless will be installed for you. But
yes...one per classroom....no overlapping channels...etc. Most MLTI
schools have the Apple airports.
>
>
>2)Charging stations‑ what works well, one in each room? Etc

we have a charging cabinet in each homeroom (we built 'em) Some schools
have actually installed electrical outlets in each locker
>
>
>3)power in the rooms for students with dead batteries, how do you handle
>this classroom by classroom

Charging cabinets. they look a lot like a teachers mailbox
setup.....about 25 slots one for each laptop and 25 outlets
>
>
>4)Take home policies, is it allowed, insurance ( I think I saved a bunch
>of these from earlier posts), but any learning would be appreciated

Take home is a must....it's expected by the MLTI folks. The project is
somewhat pointless at the HS level without it. We do self insurance.
Families pay $50....the money stays local and is put into a fund to repair
laptops in the case of "out of warranty" damage...etc. Although a lot is
covered with MLTI. Insurance would take care of broken screens...etc.
You also will probably have buffers.
>
>
>5)Tech staffing, what level, what skills, ratio of macbooks to techs for
>staffing ratios

You are going to need more help with 700+ laptops....trust me. Especially
in the deployment phase. As you get going and get into the swing of
calling Applecare and shipping them to the depot...etc....it will get
better, but since you're a relative newbie it will take a while
>
>
>6)What do you do with existing labs?? How about CAD or adobe cs4 etc
>labs, keep them replace them etc.

Keep 'em for now

1. You know what happens when you assume, but until I hear otherwise, I will assume the "rules" will stay the same. This means I assume Apple will be behind the wireless network. Warranteed as well. But ironically, I have never needed a second of help under the warranty in seven years.

2. In our middle school it is an expectation that a charged laptop is part of "being prepared for class." We have carts in our middle school homerooms to charge machines that don't go home. This is not a viable solution for the high school as we are talking 1150 machines. So we are thinking the kiddos will be responsible to charge them at home. Our middle school is 30 plus years old. Two outlets in each room so charging during the day is not really an option and is discouraged.

3. See #2 I guess.

4. MLTI goal is for them to go home. Very little of my damage issues over the years is "at home" damage. See above how this will be important for charging. We implemented an insurance program at the middle school for this current year. We are talking about expanding this to the high school. Yes, there is a buffer pool but in no way does that come close to meeting the needs of my breakage.

5. Originally in the same boat. I have 950 iBooks/Macbooks out there I pretty much support by myself. We have since talked about adding a person, but this morning see our EPS for tech is getting gutted to provide the laptops so who knows. It's weird to read that business talks about a 60‑125 to one ratio for users to technician but I can actually have a discussion about 2000 to one.

6. We continue to maintain two PC labs in our middle school, even after all these years.

7. I agree with Tim. I have been dedicated MLTI for five years now. I enjoy the little bit of integration work I do and cherish the time I spend working with the kids on this. I also agree that the repair and parts process is excellent. Get comfortable with GSX for batteries and AC adapters (two things that SHOULD be a light demand in the beginning) and I have found working with the Depot to be effortless. I find parts through GSX, if ordered by 5 p.m. are in on the next FedEx delivery (9:30‑10 am the next morning). Depot repairs generally two days if they aren't swamped. I also realize I am only like ten miles from the Depot but I see that an iBook leaving the Depot in Westbrook goes to Brewer before coming back to Windham. I also love to graze on ARD, looking for kiddos that have gone astray. Usually, just a quick message from "The Administrator" sends them down the correct path. Do it enough times and the word gets out that "we are being watched."


‑‑‑‑‑Original Message‑‑‑‑‑
From: ACTEM:Assoc. of Computer Technology Educators of Maine on behalf of Tim Levesque
Sent: Thu 3/12/2009 9:35 AM
To: ACTEMLIST@LISTS.MAINE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ACTEMlist] 1x1 implementation questions

Some answers for you Ed

1) Apple was responsible for setting up ours, they determined the proper placement and settings of the access points and even installed them AND a POE switch to boot.

2) We have a charging station in each grade homeroom for the middle school. This seems to work well. PIHS has outlets in student lockers..not sure if that would be a feasible route but it is something else that has been done.

3. We've handled dead batteries by telling the students to ensure that they keep their laptops charged. Most of them take the advice because there's nothing more embarassing than being the only kid without a computer during a lesson:)

4. Take home policy for MLTI MS is that all laptops should be going home with the students. As for insurance, Jeff Mao has stated on many occasions that laptops are covered by the buffer pool but in any case, we provide our own insurance for accidental damage or theft.

5. Unfortunately I can't give you any insight on this one. I'm the one and only tech guy for our district. I was struggling to handle the amount of laptops we have now, I have no idea how I'm going to handle the entire HS by myself. I may cry. I find that's a good way to handle things sometimes:).

6. We keep our PC computer labs because of many reasons but the best one is that the public sometimes uses our machines and it's good to have an accessible PC lab that everyone can use.

7. Have fun with it! Working with the middle school students using the MLTI computers has allowed me to have the most fun I've ever had in my career. Using ARD to help students along during a lesson or research..or even just to hassle them for doing something they shouldn't be..it keeps things different and interesting. Plus..the reliability of the machines themselves ..is unmatched. Even in the rare case that one of them breaks down, the MLTI repair process is so streamlined and fast, the computer is often back to you before you even realize it's gone.

Hope that helps.



Tim Levesque
MCP, A+, NET+
Technology Director
Easton School Department
207‑488‑7702 ext 18
www.eastonschooldistrict.org

Well, PCHS has been at 1:1 since the fall of 2002, we've made a few
mistakes and we've worked out a few kinks.
>
>Crystal Priest...
>1)Wireless access points, how many (one per classroom, other, power
>settings channels, any watch out fors,,apple vs Cisco etc)
MTLI Project will deal with this.
>
>
>2)Charging stations‑ what works well, one in each room? Etc
Nope, lost too many batteries with these when we tried them at the HS
level. No storage cabinets to speak of either. Just a few spaces for
those kids who have lost the privilege of taking them home. Now they all
get 1 computer, case, charger and battery ‑ with everything tagged,
labeled, engraved. They get 'em the 2nd week of school and they need to
return 'em after the finals are over in the spring.
>
>
>3)power in the rooms for students with dead batteries, how do you handle
>this classroom by classroom
We put ceiling mounted drop cords in each classroom ‑ 3 or 4 per room, 4
outlet boxes per drop cord. They are located over the tables in the
classrooms. Helps a lot!
>
>
>4)Take home policies, is it allowed, insurance ( I think I saved a bunch
>of these from earlier posts), but any learning would be appreciated

They go home, policies are posted somewhere on our website, but I'm in the
middle of revamping the website so they may not be up there right now.

We self insure, and are certified to do our own warranty repair work ‑
which helps a lot!
>
>
>5)Tech staffing, what level, what skills, ratio of macbooks to techs for
>staffing ratios

Me ‑ full time, K‑12, district wide tech. director
1 full time K‑8 technician housed at the middle school.
1 full time tech ed teacher at the high school who is an Apple certified
repair person and who teaches full time and does repairs on the side.
1 part time consultant who does integration and curriculum work K‑12 for
60 days a year.

550 kids gr. 4‑12 with a laptop
150ish staff members gr. k‑12 with a laptop

With any luck, another technician for next year.
>
>
>6)What do you do with existing labs??
Got rid of them years ago, got rid of 2 portables as a result of
reclaiming the labs as classroom space.
>How about CAD
Load Vectorworks onto CAD students laptops and have larger flat screen
monitors for them to jack into in CAD class. This way they can continue
working on their drawings outside of class time. Also got this package as
concurrent licensing.

>or adobe cs4 etc
Well, we have CS, not CS4 but . . . Craig can get concurrent licenses
for this package through ACTEM and if you have metering software you can
install it on all machines, which we do. Not an issue.
>
>
>7) Whatever else that I am missing
Probably a lot, but keep asking questions.

Fun!

Crystal

Crystal Priest
Technology Coordinator
MSAD #4

"ACTEM:Assoc. of Computer Technology Educators of Maine"
<ACTEMLIST@LISTS.MAINE.EDU> writes:
>On average for a current macbook it takes around 45 mins for a reimage via
>FW drive. If they do all grades at once I could expect around 1200+
>machines. So lets say it takes 1 hour to reimage 1 machine (includes 45
>mins for image, 15 for boot, inventory, post‑image work and setting up in
>charging station). That would be 1200 person hours. Now lets say you have
>25 FW drives so you could do 25 laptops per hour. In a perfect world it
>would take a couple of weeks of non‑stop imaging to setup 1200 machines.
>Now in the MLTI world, things work differently than in the normal apple
>world. Last summer many school systems had problems with reimaging 10.5
>iBooks. Reimage time could be increased depending on packages, problems,
>etc.

If you budget for anything this spring....budget for a whole bunch of
external hard drives. You'll get a bunch with the laptops, but you'll
want more. I'm able to image my laptops over a couple days....while
working on other things (I generally do them myself)....I set up 10 or
more....set them all to reimage via ARD and go do something else for an
hour....come back and repeat. If I had a lot of them....I'd do 20‑30 at a
time. We'll wait until Monday to find out more, but....if it turns out
that we'll be using the external drive method....start planning now....for
space...tables...and power strips.

I use our IA shop. I set up tables with power strips and chargers. No
need to keep swapping chargers....just grab 20 or so and hook them
up....and use those for the duration of the imaging process. You'll also
want a wired connection for the ibook if you plan to rename them and so
forth using ARD. You can rename them via a package if you wish. If you
plan on doing ANY post‑install work via ARD...I recommend doing it wired
as it's MUCH faster. So...you hook up the laptop....turn it
on....(repeat for all 20 or so). Not too hard once you get in the rhythm.
I can do 10 or so in about 3 to 4 mins. If you have help...it goes MUCH
faster. Once they are all on...user ARD to set them all to boot from the
restore drive...use ARD to restart them...and walk away. The rest is
automatic.

One thing to remember for this fall....they will all come with the latest
image already on them. Any changes you need to make can be done via
packages using the Task Server or via ARD. The real "reimaging" job isn't
until the following summer.

David N. Trask
Technology Teacher/Director
Vassalboro Community School
dtrask@vcsvikings.org
(207)923‑3100


"ACTEM:Assoc. of Computer Technology Educators of Maine"
<ACTEMLIST@LISTS.MAINE.EDU> writes:
>Again, for the experienced schools who have deployed for a number of
>years in good quantities. What have you settled out on re the students
>storing and backing up their data. Normally I would go with a server
>centric model where the student account and data would reside on an
>in‑house server. Given that the DOE approved model does not support
>Networked user accounts etc. and is based on a client centric
>environment, what have you found that works? Are you using the supplied
>storage space that comes from study wiz or apple ( the location of the
>default 1x1 backup app),,is that a good system (I'm really asking here,
>not making a judgment, I have no experience with it)...Do you use Google
>Docs storage?? Thumb drives? Again your input would be invaluable
>
>
On machine storage, with student accounts on our server for them to use as
backups ‑ entirely up to them to back their stuff up.

I also started selling USB drives to them this year at cost ‑ got a great
deal from Data Memory for them. I've sold them blank CD‑rs or DVDs for
years for non‑project stuff so they can have a backup that way if they
wish.

The reality is that people don't back up until they lose a hard drive and
then they pay attention.

80% of our kids and staff are non‑mlti so we use our own servers, not the
MLTI 1 to 1 backup.
>
>
>Also, email, do you use study wiz, Google
>docs/gmail,,other,,,thanks,,I'll file your responses .
We use Firstclass for all staff and student accounts.

Crystal

Crystal Priest
Technology Coordinator
MSAD #4

All our students from grades 6‑12 have individual user accounts on a
Windows server (grades below this have class logins). When the student
(6‑12) logs in on a Windows machines, their network drive is mapped and
they are good to go as expected they should be.

On MLTI devices (both the current ones and the previous deployment) we
have done the following:

1. Created sharepoints on the Windows server. Such as "msstudents$" for
middle school students, "hsstudents$" for high school students. Change
"students" to "staff" for the staff.
2. I created a simple Applescript to mount that sharepoint when run. The
process asks for the student's username and password and it is mounted.
Users run this script when needed.

The script is:

Tell Application "Finder"
Mount Volume "smb://server/sharepoint$"
End Tell

I continue to play once in a while to get the 1‑1 backup to do the same
thing. Haven't gotten it yet. This is an app that comes with the image
designed to (either automatically at login and/or on demand) to ftp (I
think) items in a particular location to the backup destination
specified.

Peter C. Mullen
Technology Specialist for Student Support
Windham School Department
228 Windham Center Road
Windham, Maine 04062
(207)892‑1820 Ext. 2294
Fax:(207)892‑1826
‑‑‑‑‑Original Message‑‑‑‑‑
From: ACTEM:Assoc. of Computer Technology Educators of Maine
[mailto:ACTEMLIST@LISTS.MAINE.EDU] On Behalf Of Ed Bourdeau
Sent: Friday, March 13, 2009 7:16 AM
To: ACTEMLIST@LISTS.MAINE.EDU
Subject: [ACTEMlist] 1x1 implementation questions‑Student Documents
storage planning

Again, for the experienced schools who have deployed for a number of
years in good quantities. What have you settled out on re the students
storing and backing up their data. Normally I would go with a server
centric model where the student account and data would reside on an
in‑house server. Given that the DOE approved model does not support
Networked user accounts etc. and is based on a client centric
environment, what have you found that works? Are you using the supplied
storage space that comes from study wiz or apple ( the location of the
default 1x1 backup app),,is that a good system (I'm really asking here,
not making a judgment, I have no experience with it)...Do you use Google
Docs storage?? Thumb drives? Again your input would be invaluable



Also, email, do you use study wiz, Google
docs/gmail,,other,,,thanks,,I'll file your responses . I'm in the
middle of my planning phase with more questions than answers as I'm sure
many of you are, thanks again ,,Ed



Ed Bourdeau

Director of Technology

Erskine Academy

Tel. 1‑207‑445‑2962‑ext 125

Didn't see the email part. Sorry.
No email for students.
We had committed to Moodle long before Studywiz was available and go
with that.

Peter C. Mullen

"ACTEM:Assoc. of Computer Technology Educators of Maine"
<ACTEMLIST@LISTS.MAINE.EDU> writes:
>Again, for the experienced schools who have deployed for a number of
>years in good quantities. What have you settled out on re the students
>storing and backing up their data. Normally I would go with a server
>centric model where the student account and data would reside on an
>in‑house server.

We simply provide back up space on the server. We treat the model just
like we would if it were our own laptop. I dunno about most of you, but
my own personal laptop is just that...and I store my stuff on the hard
drive or a back up drive. That's how we treat the MLTI laptops. Works
well and removes the data responsibility from me and shifts it on to the
user where it belongs.

>Given that the DOE approved model does not support
>Networked user accounts etc. and is based on a client centric
>environment, what have you found that works? Are you using the supplied
>storage space that comes from study wiz or apple ( the location of the
>default 1x1 backup app),,is that a good system (I'm really asking here,
>not making a judgment, I have no experience with it)...Do you use Google
>Docs storage?? Thumb drives? Again your input would be invaluable

We don't use Studywiz for backup....most is done locally. Some kids use
drop.io and some use dropbox....most use thumbdrives and the like. We
used to sell thumbdrives, but this year we didn't as most already had them
and simply weren't going to buy from us. Also, a large number of kids are
in the habit of using google docs now. We have a Google Apps for
Education domain and that makes life really easy as far as docs and
storage.


David N. Trask
Technology Teacher/Director
Vassalboro Community School
dtrask@vcsvikings.org
(207)923‑3100

We offer a variety of options for storage, but have found in offering these
options that students most often use their Google Docs or other tools
associated with their G.apps account or other online tools they already use
to "back‑up" their school *stuff*. We've found they think differently about
storage and archiving ‑ from what I or others traditionally have thought of
as storage and back‑up. I'm talking about 7‑12 students and mostly about
our 9‑12 kids (some teachers even :o). And with Google Docs especially, as
our teachers have started shaping interactions with students using the same
tools... the real value beyond "backing‑up" their stuff has been positively
transformative for those educational environments.

We have lots of other issues to deal with because of these practices, but at
a meaningful level it has provided our students and educators with tools
that they are using to enhance teaching and learning. I also think it helps
provide learning about digital citizenship and opportunities to model and
learn as educators and learning community members.



On Fri, Mar 13, 2009 at 7:58 AM, Peter Mullen <pmullen@windham.k12.me.us>wrote:

  • Didn't see the email part. Sorry.
  • No email for students.
  • We had committed to Moodle long before Studywiz was available and go
  • with that.
>
> Peter C. Mullen
  • Technology Specialist for Student Support
  • Windham School Department
  • 228 Windham Center Road
  • Windham, Maine 04062
  • (207)892‑1820 Ext. 2294
  • Fax:(207)892‑1826
>
> ‑‑‑‑‑Original Message‑‑‑‑‑
>
> Again, for the experienced schools who have deployed for a number of
  • years in good quantities. What have you settled out on re the students
  • storing and backing up their data. Normally I would go with a server
  • centric model where the student account and data would reside on an
  • in‑house server. Given that the DOE approved model does not support
  • Networked user accounts etc. and is based on a client centric
  • environment, what have you found that works? Are you using the supplied
  • storage space that comes from study wiz or apple ( the location of the
  • default 1x1 backup app),,is that a good system (I'm really asking here,
  • not making a judgment, I have no experience with it)...Do you use Google
  • Docs storage?? Thumb drives? Again your input would be invaluable
>
>
>
  • Also, email, do you use study wiz, Google
  • docs/gmail,,other,,,thanks,,I'll file your responses . I'm in the
  • middle of my planning phase with more questions than answers as I'm sure
  • many of you are, thanks again ,,Ed
>
>
>
  • Ed Bourdeau
>
> Director of Technology
>
  • Erskine Academy
>
> Tel. 1‑207‑445‑2962‑ext 125
>



‑‑
Mark Arnold, Technology Integration Coordinator
Deer Isle ‑ Stonington Community Schools
mr.markarnold@gmail.com

I have been with the MLTI program since day 1.
I work at a school with about 350 laptops now (give or take),the
population has decreased over the last few years. I would love to
share some of my experience by answering a few of these questions.
On Mar 12, 2009, at 8:28 AM, Ed Bourdeau wrote:
>
  • The questions:
>
> 1)Wireless access points, how many (one per classroom, other, power
  • settings channels, any watch out fors,,apple vs Cisco etc)
Apple came in and accessed then implemented the network. It works
great. They set it all up, tested it and even leave a spare airport/
switch. All that info is in the Tech NoteShare notebook in Studywiz.
>
>
  • 2)Charging stations‑ what works well, one in each room? Etc
We tried custom designed shelves, (ended up cutting power cords when
the doors closed) Our best find are wire racks, like at Sams.
(actually Target has them on sale this week) We can zip tie power
strips to them (pay attention to the direction the actual outlets face
on the power strip so power bricks can be lined up side by side. Some
power strips do not do that. I found the big 12 port ones at Home
depot were great as 2 of those usually handle the biggest classes.
Also as you may already know daisy chaining power strips is a no no.)
and the air circulates around the device with these shelves to help
keep everything cool. The classrooms all have doors with locks so that
is how we lock them up at night.

We also have wire racks in the cafeteria where laptops are stored
while kids are eating. We keep the piles to 2 devices or less and
hassle anyone using the laptop case as a backpack.
.

>
>
  • 3)power in the rooms for students with dead batteries, how do you
  • handle
  • this classroom by classroom
We purchased 2 battery charge stations and a few extra batteries. We
bar coded the batteries and placed them in the library. If a kid runs
low they take their battery to the Library and sign out a new one. The
Librarian pops the student battery in her charger and at the end of
the day the student trades back. The librarian likes it because it
increases her circulation records and I like it because it eliminates
power cord accidents…which may not be as bad with the MacBook magnetic
power adaptors. I also like it because she questions repeat offenders
and helps eliminate/educate the lazy laptoppers and (helps diagnose
battery problems). All students have their name on their batteries via
an Avery easy peel sticker.

>
>
  • 4)Take home policies, is it allowed, insurance ( I think I saved a
  • bunch
  • of these from earlier posts), but any learning would be appreciated
The original take home procedure was a family night where the student
and a guardian attend a presentation on proper care, specific school
rules and expectations and an overview of the device/software. I still
do that for the seventh grade each year. I still have the original
movie(s) and the keynote if anyone needs it. Maybe we could work
collaboratively on a Google Doc / slide show to make a new high school
version? The beauty of this roll out is all these kids have had an
MLTI device (at least if they went to public school in Maine during
their junior high years. So they should know how to take care of and
use the device.

We have never insured nor charged a fee to take the laptop home, we do
ask that the parent attend an informational meeting. We budget for 2
broken screens each year and use the buffer pool or parents to cover
others. We ordered surplus chargers from the state at a discount for
those that were eaten by the dog…

>
>
  • 5)Tech staffing, what level, what skills, ratio of macbooks to techs
  • for
  • staffing ratios
I know I'm a bit mac biased but I take care of around 350 mac laptops,
all the airports, some switches, printers, several servers, and
desktops in the whole building. I also teach Art full time. In my
opinion Macs are very easy to trouble shoot and maintain. We have a
philosophy here that I help you you help others…our school knows we
all help each other and it works, at least for us. I think one full
time person could handle a school my size.

>
>
  • 6)What do you do with existing labs?? How about CAD or adobe cs4 etc
  • labs, keep them replace them etc.

I took our lab apart and placed one desktop in each classroom…they
rarely get used.
Some software can police itself and will not allow more than a certain
number of users on a network, so maybe those could be added to your
image….
Packages are pretty easy to make and can be installed and removed
quickly.
If the program needs a bigger monitor, or license issues…you may still
need your lab. (or at least the monitors)
>
>
  • 7) Whatever else that I am missing

We do a sign out sheet, but next year I think I am going to do a
laminated sign out. the parent agrees to the take home policy, (we
have it online) and kids will be asked to leave the laminated, signed,
sheet when the laptop goes home. I am thinking it will allow the
teacher to keep track of their laptops. (To do a count each morning
and night.) Not sure how that will work at the high school level…

We have all devices stored in homeroom. We actually revamped our day
and added a 5 minute homeroom at the end of the school day too. The
announcements happen then and kids sign out or leave their laptops.

I bought avery easy peel stickers and each laptop, battery, and power
adaptor is marked with the student's name.

I have a google doc form, where each kid types in their serial number,
asset tag, power adaptor number, battery number and laptop condition.
I try to do that twice a year. At the beginning and at the end.

I have another google doc form where kids can post laptop problems.
Now that google docs have rss it's great. Any new posts come right
into my reader.

I have coconut battery zipped as a download off the moodle with some
instructions. They run coconut battery if they think they have a
problem and if the current battery capacity falls lower than 50% than
original battery capacity, they take a screen shot of the window
(apple, shift 4, space bar, position camera over window, click) they
attach the screen shot to an email (to me), add their serial number
and asset number and request a new battery. Then I order online via
gsx. Usually the battery arrives the next day. We swap them out and
they have a new battery.



MLTI History:

Fall 2004 ‑ 31 high schools opt in to MLTI (iBook G4) at their own expense



On Tue, Mar 31, 2009 at 2:34 PM, Hank Read <HRead@msad5.org> wrote:
  • I have added one step
>
> ‑‑‑‑‑Original Message‑‑‑‑‑
>
> Can someone who has been with the program from the beginning confirm a
  • timeline of the history of MLTI? I put what I think is the timeline down
  • below. Thanks.
>
> Winter 2002 ‑ Nine middle schools become Exploration Sites to pilot the
  • program
>
> Fall 2002 ‑ 7th Grade students get Apple G3 iBooks
>
  • Fall 2003 ‑ 7th Grade takes their laptops to 8th Grade ‑ new Apple G3
  • iBooks for 7th Grade
>
>>>Fall 2004 ‑ (how many?) high schools opt in to MLTI (iBook G4) at their own expense
>
  • Fall 2006 ‑ MLTI II ‑ new Apple G4 iBooks purchased for 7th and 8th grades
>
> Fall 2007 ‑ High School teachers get MacBooks